Volunteering & Corporate Baby Boomers

I recently heard someone say that the reason volunteering and mission are so important to Millenials is that they're not stupid: they watched a significant portion of Baby Boomers realize what was important to them, and decided to skip to the end of the story.  If it's true, it's pretty brilliant, really.

A later conversation brought up the point: if a business could figure out how to meaningfully engage boomers in a way that leads to higher levels of satisfaction, and retained them in the work force for another 3-5 years, what could that mean for economic impact? 

It could mean a lot.  So this got me thinking: what would a corporate volunteer program need to look like in order to provide meaningful engagement to the boomer, add value to a corporation and also add value to a NonProfit (although the last one seems obvious.)  It turns out that the Taproot Foundation had been wondering the same thing, and undertook a study in 2007 to do some digging.  

If you're interested in building CSR programs that are relevant to your Corporate Baby Boomers (CBBs as referred in the article) Here are points to consider, with of course, my commentary

CBBs EXPECT TO VOLUNTEER

They also want volunteer opportunities to be as flexible as their work schedules.

CBBs HAVE HIGH EXPECTATIONS AND DEMANDS

It's almost a requirement to ensure volunteer activity to be a 'right' fit for their skills and desired development opportunities.

CBBs WANT STRUCTURED OPPORTUNITIES USING SKILLS

Creating programs with clear expectations and firm begin and end dates for engagement will yield the best results.

Of course, the article also called out points for the Nonprofit organizations as well. 

NEED FOR A LARGE NUMBER OF CBBs WITH RELEVANT SKILLS

If you're not trying to reach out to this demographic you're missing a huge opportunity.

REACHING CBBs IS CHALLENGING

Helping establish corporate pro-bono programs or specific volunteer opportunities for this demographic may be useful.

I thought this study was interesting on many different levels.  In particular the fact that in 8 years, the conversation hasn't changed, but the primary players have: almost any of these points could be easily applied to Millenial research as well.  Were you surprised? 

 

 

 

HRDora LutzComment